To hold, or not to hold: Tokyo residents torn two months before Olympics

  • Toshihiko Osawa, 67, the third-generation owner of the traditional sweet shop

    Toshihiko Osawa, 67, the third-generation owner of the traditional sweet shop "Kintaro Ame" poses for a photograph at his shop in Tokyo, Japan, May 5, 2021. "If there aren't any spectators, there won't be as much tension and thrill for the athletes," said Osawa. "To have spectators and have everybody yelling is nicer."

  • Isao Kawada, 77, a retiree, poses for a portrait as he visits a public bathhouse Daikoku-yu, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7, 2021. Kawada, who will only receive his first vaccine on July 2, said he still wanted the Games to go ahead.

    Isao Kawada, 77, a retiree, poses for a portrait as he visits a public bathhouse Daikoku-yu, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7, 2021. Kawada, who will only receive his first vaccine on July 2, said he still wanted the Games to go ahead. "We should have them. After all, everybody looked forward to them," he said. "There's just no excitement. The mood now is almost like a wake."

  • Shuta Yano, 28, a ball dancer, poses for a portrait as he performs on the street in Harajuku, Tokyo, Japan, May 3, 2021.

    Shuta Yano, 28, a ball dancer, poses for a portrait as he performs on the street in Harajuku, Tokyo, Japan, May 3, 2021. "I'm not an athlete, but I have spent my life mastering special skills, so in that sense I think I understand the athletes. So taking their point of view, I thought it would be good to hold them... But I've thought about it a lot and my feelings are a bit different now. Yes, they've spent their lives getting to this point. But holding the Olympics now is a situation that might not just change a few lives entirely, but many," said Yano.

  • Theres Wik, 31, an office worker from Finland who is living in Tokyo, poses for a portrait as she walks through Takeshita Street of Harajuku, in Tokyo, Japan, May 3, 2021.

    Theres Wik, 31, an office worker from Finland who is living in Tokyo, poses for a portrait as she walks through Takeshita Street of Harajuku, in Tokyo, Japan, May 3, 2021. "I personally think they (the Games) should be held for the economy, but when you think about everybody's safety I think they should be cancelled," said Wik.

  • Double-dutch rope-jumper KAI, 29, and his team REG STYLE pose for a portrait while practicing at Yoyogi park in Tokyo, Japan, May 2, 2021.

    Double-dutch rope-jumper KAI, 29, and his team REG STYLE pose for a portrait while practicing at Yoyogi park in Tokyo, Japan, May 2, 2021. "I also think we probably don't need to go out of our way to hold them, (the Games)" KAI said. "But if they could give people energy and take place in a happy mood, I think they should definitely take place."

  • Nobuaki Moribe, 37, a pet salon owner, poses for a portrait as he takes dogs for a walk at Yoyogi park in Tokyo, Japan, May 2, 2021.

    Nobuaki Moribe, 37, a pet salon owner, poses for a portrait as he takes dogs for a walk at Yoyogi park in Tokyo, Japan, May 2, 2021. "The virus is here to stay and people shouldn't give in," said Moribe. "I want to watch the activities of people pursuing their goals and dreams."

  • Mirei Sakai, 73, a pensioner and former caretaker for people with disabilities, poses for a portrait as she visits the Sugamo district, an area popular with the Japanese elderly, in Tokyo, Japan, May 5, 2021. Sakai is adamant the Games should be called off.

    Mirei Sakai, 73, a pensioner and former caretaker for people with disabilities, poses for a portrait as she visits the Sugamo district, an area popular with the Japanese elderly, in Tokyo, Japan, May 5, 2021. Sakai is adamant the Games should be called off. "The pandemic is a terrible situation all over the world right now. In the middle of this, you'd invite foreigners over here," she said. "I feel sorry for the athletes, but it's unavoidable."