Indian External Affairs Secretary Vinay Kwatra meets Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at the Ganabhaban on Wednesday, Feb 15, 20223.
)Indian External Affairs Secretary Vinay Kwatra meets Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at the Ganabhaban on Wednesday, Feb 15, 20223.
Bangladesh

Delhi ‘fully supports’ Hasina’s leadership in Bangladesh, says India external affairs secretary

ByNews Desk

Indian External Affairs Secretary Vinay Kwatra has said New Delhi is fully supportive of Sheikh Hasina’s leadership in Bangladesh.

The visiting Indian external affairs official paid a courtesy call on the prime minister at the Ganabhaban on Wednesday, according to BSS.

“We’ve total support to you and your leadership,” a PMO spokesman quoted Kwatra as telling the premier when Hasina said Bangladesh considered India as a trusted friend and hoped to see the ties between the neighbouring  nations deepening further.

Hasina’s speech writer Md Nazrul Islam later said Kwatra told Hasina that India would be by Bangladesh’s side in its development endeavours and progress in the political and economic affairs.

He said Kwatra invited Hasina to the 18th edition of the Group of Twenty or G20 Summit which will be held in New Delhi on September 9-10 this year.

The prime minister, according to him, accepted the invitation and thanked her Indian counterpart Narendra Modi, who as the current chair of the G20 grouping of larger economies, invited Bangladesh as a “guest country” in its all meetings.

According to the spokesman, the top bureaucrat of the Indian foreign office described Dhaka-New Delhi ties as “very firm” and said the entire world now valued the relationships as it reached to a strategic level.

“This relationship is being strengthened further,” he added.

Hasina said both the countries could join forces in improving each other’s socio-economic conditions.

Kwatra said New Delhi was trying to make the terms and conditions of Indian Line of Credit, or LoC, easier so Bangladesh could avail the credit and repay it easily.

He added the own currencies of both the countries could be used to run bilateral trades and businesses.

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